Pot is legal in washington D.C.

#4
Well of all the heinous stuff you toss people into prison for- pot's like so harmless compared to breaking/entering. Despite the fact that private prisons make bank off of capturing and re-releasing violent offenders, heavy drug users, rapists, child molesters and people who smoke pot.

People are sick and tired of others getting penalized for just having pot on them. Pot smokers aren't breaking and entering, raping others, murdering, abusing wives and children. Taxpayers are sick of paying to keep prisons stocked with people who haven't done anything save for smoking a stupid plant. However with the decriminalization will come legalization for profit. Where prisons will lose money, the State has much to gain profit margin wise. You can only win so many battles and this is just the first step.
 

Eric

Owner
Staff member
Stormy Days(HC)
#5
Yea... but,

The government will lose money here, until they legalize the sales.


Anyways, ill be happy when it is legal everywhere. After all, its safer then drinking alcohol!
 
#6
Just my personal opinion, but I don't care if this magical "legalese" thing called marijuana is illegal or legal, because I possess and own hemp (my property) which has never been "unlawful" in the Common Law nation known as United States of America (U.S. is one governmental state out of 300 million in this land). Hemp/cannabis has always been Lawful to have and use, because there was never a direct public opinion laid down (Law) created against the plant e.g. Alcohol Prohibition happened because the public was directly for it and later against it. Legislatures simply give opinions to the public, that's all they're doing - it's not Law they're making in regards to a man or woman; however, a U.S. Citizen Person do have to agree to U.S. Legislative passings because he/she "ascribed" to such a duties and obligations.

If people want to know more about what Common Law or Law: common to people is really all about, because it is what the U.S.A., Canada, Britain, Australia, and India practice, then I suggest people check this man named "Karl Lentz" for more information; he's not a lawyer or attorney, he's just a man who knows Law and how to apply it effectively, yet make it so simple to understand - no lawyer/attorney gibberish. Once again, "Karl Lentz."
 
#7
I have had many tell me this same thing, but I am glad you could lay it out for others valiantx . I have also had many tell me about the same thing in reference to prostitution, but that is a whole different subject.

Eric I feel the legalization in D.C and Alaska is a HUGE mile marker in U.S history. I have had to quit since my detox from Cymbalta, but I am patiently looking forward to the day when I can smoke, with a child in my home, and Human Services can't do a darn thing about it--which they did when the hospital I was seeking recovery at contacted Human Services because I had weed in my system and I am a parent. So much hate in this world.

I am hoping Mississippi will be next on the legalizing list. After all, our state already grows hemp for Colorado,Washington and California. Alabama was where I got into "trouble" though, which is why I moved to Mississippi.
 
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#8
Wow this is crazy. I never would have thought. I agree with Eric. The capitol is the last place I would have expected weed to become legal.

What's even even crazier is the "you can't sell you can only use" thing. How much sense does that make?
 
#9
It's only a matter of time before it's legalized everywhere anyways. Regardless of the government, the people TO and AGAINST it, and the people wanting to make money off it like the Colorado Grow Farms. This is no different from the prohibition period with everyone condemning it, then eventually black market selling it, coming to terms with it, and eventually legalizing it. This habit has been repeated throughout history more times than just Weed or Tobacco products, as well.

I think in twenty odds years Marijuana will be legalized, taxed, buyable in stores, and nowhere near as potent as it is today. It'll be like buying a watered down version of a cigarette. But it'll be readily available, and there will be another drug taking it's place. It's always a constantly shifting market on morals and what "is" and "isn't" right.
 
#10
It doesn't make much sense KenBrace, but I feel that one of things that our government is trying to rid of is "drug dealers." If marijuana is legal, and legal to grow, it is much better to grow your own than to have to rely on others for it. I feel it is a way to say that you should know what is in your weed, and a way to say that they would rather people be more focused on productive industrial jobs. Kinda like how people are pulling away from processed foods.

I have personally had more than my share of bad deals from people I never thought would do me that way, but hate is everywhere. There is nothing like paying $150 for an ounce of regular marijuana, for over half of the bag to be nothing but thick dry stems and seeds, and often the "buds" are nothing more than trim leaf (the bag itself that would usually last me a month didn't even make it 2 weeks because there was no THC content). I have also purchased "kush" which ended up being nothing more than regular marijuana sprayed with chemicals, like the synthetic herbs that are now banned. When I did smoke, I had to limit who I bought from because the sprayed marijuana was not a joke, nor was it in any way fun. But having to limit often left me without for weeks at a time.

Shimus even though I am all for the legalization, I do hope there will not be much more legalization on other drugs. I know it is a selfish thing to say, but some of those other drugs like meth, crack, and cocaine are really out there. But you are right, this is a constantly shifting market so I am sure only time will tell here.
 
#11
It doesn't make much sense KenBrace, but I feel that one of things that our government is trying to rid of is "drug dealers." If marijuana is legal, and legal to grow, it is much better to grow your own than to have to rely on others for it. I feel it is a way to say that you should know what is in your weed, and a way to say that they would rather people be more focused on productive industrial jobs. Kinda like how people are pulling away from processed foods.
Maybe so. There may also be the factor of trying to eliminate drug deals due to the rate of crime that comes from them. You're always hearing about drug deals gone bacd, people getting shot, etc. A lot of gang shootings are because of drug deals gone bad.

I you were going your own weed that wouldn't be a problem. So I guess I can see some sense there. I would still be interested the hear the politician's take on the matter and what the real reason was for them creating the law that way.
 
#14
I too am very interested KenBrace. I would have to make a movie night out of these "perfect politician bodies" talking about their reasoning's behind these laws. I have never pulled a gun on anyone over a bad deal, but I have seen it in the news and I have heard stories from previous dealers.

It could be more of a tax thing though? Kinda like people running small businesses on the side and the owners making all that money, and not paying taxes. I am sure there are several reasons, but actually hearing them would be something worth watching ^_^
 
#15
I too am very interested KenBrace. I would have to make a movie night out of these "perfect politician bodies" talking about their reasoning's behind these laws. I have never pulled a gun on anyone over a bad deal, but I have seen it in the news and I have heard stories from previous dealers.
Most drug deals go smoothly I think. Especially if it's between friends or people that you hang out with.

I think most of the problems occur when gangs or gang members are involved. Usually people involved in drug deals gone bad are also a part of or affiliated with gangs.
 
#16
I'm happy that people can't go to jail over a plant. That's pretty much it for me. At the end of the day we all know money is involved somewhere. That is the thing that sucks about it.Eric is right too, safer than people drinking but it smells. It smells even worse now that I know people refer to it as "skunk".
 
#17
Most drug deals go smoothly I think. Especially if it's between friends or people that you hang out with.

I think most of the problems occur when gangs or gang members are involved. Usually people involved in drug deals gone bad are also a part of or affiliated with gangs.
I have had lots of bad deals from friends, and honestly I wouldn't say anything to avoid confrontation. I have also dealt away with some of those friends as the quality became worst over time and I felt our friendship had turned into strictly business. But not all friends/dealers are like that.

I do agree about the gangs though! I wasn't even thinking about gangs but now that you mention it, they do stupid things for stupid reasons regardless of the involved drug. Sometimes drugs don't have to be involved but the fact that drugs are what causes most of their stupidity--I suppose they would have less to be stupid/hardcore about if the stuff was legal.
 
#18
With the decriminalization and legalization in many states, we're already seeing a financial collapse with the Mexican cartels that once relied heavily on pot sales in the States. Gangs will still be around but they're more likely gonna go for harder drugs now that pot's off the market for them.